SOFIA BHAMBRI- Managing Partner (Advocate) at S.Bhambri & Associates ANSWERS 6 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS OF LAW STUDENTS

About Sofia Bhambri

She is Managing Partner (Advocate) at S.Bhambri & Associates, Delhi. Her Boutique Law Firm was started by Mr. N.K Bhambri in the year 2011. The Primary focus was on Family Law as well as Matrimonial Law Practise. Since, then the growth has been magnanimous and now they are proud to be associated with several of our associates. They particularly deal with Matrimonial Disputes, Recovery of Money Suits, Trademark and Copyright Registration & Prosecution, Labour/Employment Laws and Compliances, Consumer Cases, Criminal Cases, DRT Matters, School Tribunal Cases, Senior Citizens Tribunal too. She as a Managing Partner, has litigation experience of 7 years in various Courts of our country such as various High Courts, District Courts, Tribunals and Forums.

She was empanelled as AMICUS CURIAE with National Consumer Dispute Redressal Commission, New Delhi. She was empanelled as Legal Aid Counsel with Delhi Legal Services Authority, West, New Delhi.

She is the Honorary Member of Advisory Board at Lecit Elite, a Legal Startup aimed at spreading awareness and aiding law students since the year, 2020. She is the founder of Initiative Raahat aimed at providing legal guidance to women in distress in particular. 

TOP 6 Questions that are most frequently asked by law students

1)Grades are important because the goal of grading is to evaluate individual students’ learning and performance. But some say that grades are not always a reliable measure for evaluating. What do you think the role of grades/CGPA is in a law student’s career? Up to what extent does a grade received in college matter? What would you say to students who haven’t been able to get good grades/CGPA in college as many students fear that due to bad grades/CGPA they won’t be able to get jobs in top law firms or companies?

Sofia Bhambri-” As far as grades are concerned, they do not have that much effect, while a law graduate’s profile is being scrutinized for hiring purpose. As practical internship experience is considered. However, it does not mean that a law student must turn a blind eye towards his or her grades completely. It is quite alright that you may be an average student, however, if you have loads of practical internship experience matching with the job description then, it is likely that you would be hired.  I would like to add that if, a law student is striving to pursue his or her Masters Degree from outside India, then, the grades or percentage must mandatorily be above average, as the foreign Universities consider good grades prior to issuing admission offer to a student.”

2)Students are often confused about what a good CV looks like which can attract the attention of employers. Many students even pay some organisations to make a good CV for them. You must have changed and updated your CV/Resume many times in your career and you must have even seen many CV/Resumes of students as well. What according to you is an ideal CV? And what is the difference between a rejected CV and an accepted CV? In simple words, what according to you does an employer try to look for in a CV?

Sofia Bhambri-” Well, if you are freshly enrolled lawyer then your CV must include all of your internship experiences in chronological order, beginning from new to old ones. Your CV must be framed in your own language, the internship experiences more or less must match with the job description for which you are applying for. One must tailor the CVs according the requirements and the job profile for which one is applying for. Law students must refrain from making grammatical errors in their CV, as well as must not resort to getting their CVs drafted by some other person. If a law student does not know his or her strengths then how can someone else know it. They must instill confidence in themselves and must not be swayed by anyone who lures them by saying that a CV must be framed by a professional.”

3)Many students normally have a fear that since they are 1st generation law students their journey would be more difficult than a student whose parents are lawyers. What is your take on it and what would you say to them?

Sofia Bhambri-” Even if a law student is going to be a First Generation Lawyer, it is my belief that our legal profession absorbs those, who are willing to invest majority of their time in gaining experience related to his or her area of interest. Yes, it is true to some extent that second generation lawyers get a readymade platform, such as an office, already existing clientele, however, even they have to make efforts in order to gain confidence of the clients, as your name alone won’t suffice if you are not putting effort and time to build your own rapport with your clients, colleagues, seniors etc.”

4)Today most of the law students are shifting towards corporate sector because of the big salary they would get initially. There is a notion among the law students that if you join a law firm or a company you will earn money faster than if you choose to work under a senior advocate in a court. What are your thoughts on the same? And what would you tell all those students?

Sofia Bhambri-” While, choosing to work in corporate sector or otherwise is solely a lawyer’s discretion, however, the notion that money can be made faster if one chooses to work in a company or a law firm is completely false, as people forget that in a company or a law firm one gets limited salary, and while one is gaining experience and learning tricks of the trade under an advocate in his or her junior-ship, they are laying groundwork for setting up their practice in future. In  beginning, a junior may not get handsome amount of money, however, once you have invested around five years in litigation practice, then sky is the limit for you to earn, you can surpass those who are working in corporates or in law firms on salary basis. One of the best thing about litigation practice is that you are not answerable to your boss, you are your own boss, you make your own rules.”

5)In Law school there is a perception that the more the number of internships the better. Is it true? And many students feel that most of their friends get internships because of contacts and not merit due to which the students who truly deserve miss out. What would you say to them?

Sofia Bhambri-” The quality of experience one gains in an internship matters not the quantity, if you have not been able to gather practical experience during your internships then internships will be of no value addition to your CV. Furthermore, the issue with law students is that all of them want to intern at a Tier-1 law firm, they are focusing on big names, however, they ought to keep in mind that they can learn a lot from small law chambers too. When a law student can focus on learning rather than concentrating on getting internships, in places where already there is a rush, then things would start to unravel in their favour. They must not in any circumstance fall prey, to herd mentality prevalent in their batch.”

6)During 12th standard, students come under this enormous pressure to crack entrance tests to get into top-tier law schools of the country but as we all know that due to limited seats everyone cannot get into it. What would you say to students who couldn’t make their way to the top law schools?

Sofia Bhambri-” I will answer this question in straight words, well how does it matter? If one does not get into top law schools, you can pursue law from any University or Law College and still do wonders in your career. Legal profession is all about practical skills  it has less to do with the academics, while one is pursuing law. If a law student can put consistent effort into his or her work, that is to gain practical skills then, I don’t think anything can stop that person from achieving great heights.”

2 thoughts on “SOFIA BHAMBRI- Managing Partner (Advocate) at S.Bhambri & Associates ANSWERS 6 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS OF LAW STUDENTS

  1. Thank you, ma’am, for providing to the point answers. These questions always trouble non-NLU and non-law background students. I don’t know why but I always find your answers encouraging. This information was much needed. ❤❤

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